Books, General

Moon Over Soho | Review

Title: Moon Over Soho

Author: Ben Aaronovitch

Rating: 5 Stars

Dates read: 01 Apr 19 – 04 Apr 19

Publication date: 21 Apr 2011

Publisher: Gollancz

Genre(s): Fantasy, Mystery, Crime

Description:

The song. That’s what London constable and sorcerer’s apprentice Peter Grant first notices when he examines the corpse of Cyrus Wilkins, part-time jazz drummer and full-time accountant, who dropped dead of a heart attack while playing a gig at Soho’s 606 Club. The notes of the old jazz standard are rising from the body—a sure sign that something about the man’s death was not at all natural but instead supernatural.

Body and soul. They’re also what Peter will risk as he investigates a pattern of similar deaths in and around Soho. With the help of his superior officer, Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, and the assistance of beautiful jazz aficionado Simone Fitzwilliam, Peter will uncover a deadly magical menace—one that leads right to his own doorstep and to the squandered promise of a young jazz musician: a talented trumpet player named Richard “Lord” Grant—otherwise known as Peter’s dear old dad.

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Books, General

July | Wrap Up

Guys, I have fought the slump hard this year but in July there were times where the slump was too much to take and I succumbed. I am using this excuse for this abysmally late wrap! You’ll probably find it hard to believe when you see my reading stats below, but I really struggled through this month, and if it wasn’t for The Reading Rush in the last week of the month, I would have fallen down a reading slump hole that would have been difficult to escape. I know that it was a mixture of things, tiredness in the heat, coming off a holiday and going away the week after, Dad’s 60th birthday and the celebrations that go with it, and participating in a readathon that wasn’t conducive to me reading a lot (The Book Junkie Trials), but its been a difficult reading month that I am glad to see the back of (in a reading sense only, the memories have been awesome!).

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Books, General

The Silver Chair | Review

Title:The Silver Chair

Author: C S Lewis

Rating: 3 Stars

Dates read: 09 Apr 19 – 12 Apr 19

Publication date: 15 Sep 1952

Publisher: Harper Collins

Genre(s): Children’s, Classic, Fantasy

Description:

NARNIA…where owls are wise, where some of the giants like to snack on humans, where a prince is put under an evil spell…and where the adventure begins.

Eustace and Jill escape from the bullies at school through a strange door in the wall, which, for once, is unlocked. It leads to the open moor…or does it? Once again Aslan has a task for the children, and Narnia needs them. Through dangers untold and caverns deep and dark, they pursue the quest that brings them face to face with the evil Witch. She must be defeated if Prince Rillian is to be saved.

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Books, General

The Nickel Boys | Review

Title: The Nickel Boys

Author: Colson Whitehead

Rating: 5 Stars

Dates read: 01 Aug 19 – 04 Aug 19

Publication date: 01 Aug 19

Publisher: Little Brown Book Group UK

Genre(s): Historical Fiction,

Description:

Elwood Curtis has taken the words of Dr Martin Luther King to heart: he is as good as anyone. Abandoned by his parents, brought up by his loving, strict and clearsighted grandmother, Elwood is about to enroll in the local black college. But given the time and the place, one innocent mistake is enough to destroy his future, and so Elwood arrives at The Nickel Academy, which claims to provide ‘physical, intellectual and moral training’ which will equip its inmates to become ‘honorable and honest men’.

In reality, the Nickel Academy is a chamber of horrors, where physical, emotional and sexual abuse is rife, where corrupt officials and tradesmen do a brisk trade in supplies intended for the school, and where any boy who resists is likely to disappear ‘out back’. Stunned to find himself in this vicious environment, Elwood tries to hold on to Dr King’s ringing assertion, ‘Throw us in jail, and we will still love you.’ But Elwood’s fellow inmate and new friend Turner thinks Elwood is naive and worse; the world is crooked, and the only way to survive is to emulate the cruelty and cynicism of their oppressors.

The tension between Elwood’s idealism and Turner’s skepticism leads to a decision which will have decades-long repercussions.

Based on the history of a real reform school in Florida that operated for one hundred and eleven years and warped and destroyed the lives of thousands of children, The Nickel Boys is a devastating, driven narrative by a great American novelist whose work is essential to understanding the current reality of the United States.

*I received an eARC of this book courtesy of Little Brown Book Group UK and NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review*

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Books, General

Becoming | Review

Title: Becoming

Author: Michelle Obama

Rating: 5 Stars

Dates read: 13 Apr 19 – 23 Apr 19

Publication date: 13 Nov 18

Publisher: Crown

Genre(s): Non-Fiction, Memoir, Autobiography

Description:

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America – the first African-American to serve in that role – she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her – from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it – in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations – and whose story inspires us to do the same.

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